1900 - 1957

Adler

Adler Key Features

  • Type of car:  Automotive manufacturer
  • Body type:  Sedan, Coupe, Convertible, SUV, Crossover
  • Country of origin:  GERMANY
  • Built in:  GERMANY

Information about Adler

Adler, a prominent German automobile and motorcycle manufacturer, soared into the automotive scene in the year 1900, its name ‘Adler’ signifying the majestic eagle. Founded by Heinrich Kleyer, the company initially dabbled in producing bicycles, typewriters, motorcycles, and calculators, showcasing its versatility.

In the pre-World War I era, Adler employed De Dion two- and four-cylinder engines in their cars, which ranged from 1032 cc to a staggering 9081 cc. However, in 1902, under the technical direction of Edmund Rumpler, they began crafting their own engines. These automobiles, driven by the Kleyer brothers, Erwin and Otto, along with Alfred Theves, gained fame on the racing circuit, accumulating numerous victories.

Fast forward to the 1920s, and Karl Irion was dominating the racetracks in Adlers. During this period, some popular models included the 2298 cc, 1550 cc, and 4700 cc four-cylinders, as well as the 2580 cc six-cylinders. A unique touch was added when a few Standard models, constructed between 1927 and 1934, featured coachwork designed by Walter Gropius.

In 1927, the Adler Standard 6 was unveiled, boasting a 2540 cc or 2916 cc six-cylinder engine and a groundbreaking feature – Lockheed hydraulic brakes, a first in Continental Europe. The Adler Standard 8 followed suit a year later, equipped with a potent 3887 cc eight-cylinder engine. In a remarkable feat, Clärenore Stinnes circumnavigated the globe in an Adler Standard 6 from 1927 to 1929, marking a historic milestone for both Adler and the automotive industry.

In December 1930, Adler brought on board the esteemed German engineer Josef Ganz as a consultant. Ganz, with his innovative vision, created a lightweight prototype at Adler, known as the Maikäfer or May Beetle. Unfortunately, further development of the Maikäfer was halted, shifting the company’s focus to front-wheel-drive vehicles under the leadership of Hans Gustav Röhr.

In the 1930s, Adler introduced the front-wheel drive Trumpf and Trumpf-Junior models, powered by four-cylinder flat-head sv engines ranging from 995 cc to 1645 cc. These models excelled in races, including the prestigious Le Mans race. During World War II, Adler produced rear-driven models like the 1943 cc Favorit and the 2916 cc six-cylinder Diplomat, showcasing their engineering prowess.

Adler’s swan song in the automotive world came in the form of the 2.5 Liter model of 1937, featuring a six-cylinder engine producing 58 hp. Thanks to a streamlined body designed by Paul Jaray, this car could reach speeds of 125 km/h, a remarkable achievement for its time.

However, after World War II, Adler made a pivotal decision to halt automobile production. Motorcycle production resumed in 1949, leading to the creation of the MB 250S. As part of war reparations, Adler’s motorcycle designs were transferred to Britain, although it is important to note that these designs didn’t directly form the basis of Ariel’s Arrow and Leader models, despite urban legends suggesting so.

Adler gradually shifted its focus towards the production of office equipment, eventually forming the partnership Triumph-Adler. In 1957, the company was taken over by Grundig and later by Olivetti. In 1993, Olivetti sold Adlerwerke AG, which remained listed on the stock exchange. In 1999, HBAG Real Estate took over a significant portion of Adlerwerke AG’s shares, marking the end of an era for this once-revered automotive and manufacturing powerhouse.

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