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Anglo-Dane

Information about Anglo-Dane

In the early 20th century, an intriguing blend of British and Danish craftsmanship came into existence. Known as Anglo-Dane, this distinctive brand of automobiles had its roots in Copenhagen and was brought to life by H. C. Fredriksen. Originating from a background in bicycle manufacturing during the 1890s, Fredriksen ventured into the automotive realm, carrying over the hyphenated name as a nod to the British components used in his earlier endeavors.

The inaugural creations of Anglo-Dane were not your typical passenger cars; they were, instead, light trucks. Equipped with single-cylinder Belgian Kelecom engines, these trucks served as the stepping stone for the brand. Over time, the engineers at Anglo-Dane began developing their own engines, diverging from reliance on Belgian engineering. Subsequent models featured in-house designed, single-cylinder engines with 4-5 horsepower. A unique aspect of these cars was the 12-speed transmission achieved through the use of double discs and friction drive, a rare find in automobiles of that era.

Though the brand’s primary focus was on light trucks, a limited number of passenger cars were also produced. Before the cessation of its independent operations, Anglo-Dane experimented with twin-cylinder engines, adding another layer to its already diverse portfolio. In total, approximately 70 Anglo-Dane vehicles were manufactured before a significant turn of events took place.

The company eventually merged with Jan and Thrige, known for producing Triangel commercial vehicles. This merger marked the end of Anglo-Dane as a standalone brand but contributed to the larger automobile industry by combining forces with a name that remained active until 1945.

So, why does Anglo-Dane warrant attention in the annals of automotive history? Firstly, its hybrid name and origin offer an engaging narrative of cross-border collaboration, a testament to the seamless fusion of British and Danish engineering. Secondly, the focus on custom-designed engines and unique 12-speed transmission systems demonstrates the brand’s commitment to innovation. Lastly, its transition from bicycles to light trucks, and finally to a limited line of passenger cars, outlines a trajectory characterized by adaptability and evolution.

Although Anglo-Dane no longer exists as an independent entity, its legacy lives on as an example of ingenuity, craftsmanship, and the rewards of international cooperation in the automotive world. Therefore, in discussions about impactful and innovative brands that graced the automobile industry, the mention of Anglo-Dane is a must. Its journey from a simple bicycle manufacturer in Copenhagen to an automotive brand that drew the best from both British and Danish design worlds is a story worth telling and retelling.

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