1958 - 1972

Attica 

Information about Attica 

Attica, once a beacon of Greek ingenuity in the automotive sector, symbolizes a chapter in the industry’s rich tapestry. Georgios Dimitriadis, a key figure in Greek automotive history, founded Bioplastic S.A. in Moschato, Athens, and gave life to the Attica brand.

In 1958, Dimitriadis, driven by ambition, designed and built the light four-wheel Dimitriadis 505. Despite its promise, a heavy tax on four-wheel automobiles saw the vehicle’s market potential curtailed. Thus, the brand pivoted, concentrating on three-wheelers which enjoyed lighter taxation, akin to motorcycles.

The Attica model 200, born in 1962, was a light three-wheeler passenger car, licensed by Fuldamobil of Germany. With minor modifications from the original design and later, self-styled cabriolet versions, the car became a celebrated part of Greek culture. Attica didn’t stop there; in 1965, it ventured into four-wheelers with the Carmel 12, licensed by Israeli Autocars, which sadly did not mirror the success of its three-wheeled counterparts.

Bioplastic’s final automotive flourish came in 1977 with the DIM, a wholly new passenger car conceived and crafted by the company, introduced at the Geneva Motor Show. Yet, like a shooting star, it burned bright and fast, with very few units ever produced.

Today, Attica is remembered more for its successes with the model 200 than for its short-lived four-wheeler ventures. The Attica brand, though defunct, remains an enduring emblem of the creativity and challenges faced by the Greek automotive industry

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