1868 - 1976

Humber

Information about Humber

Humber, a name once synonymous with innovation and luxury in the British automotive industry, traces its roots back to 1896 when it started building motor vehicles in Coventry, initially under license from French automaker Léon Bollée. By the turn of the century, Humber had expanded its production to include motorcycles, tricycles, and quadricycles, setting a precedent for engineering excellence.

The company’s pioneering spirit was evident in its early adoption of production techniques for cars, with its first production vehicle launched in 1901. Notably, in 1908, Humber produced a range of vehicles from the modest 600cc Humberette to powerful six-cylinder, six-liter models, showcasing their capability to cater to both ends of the market. By 1913, Humber had risen to become the second-largest car manufacturer in the UK.

Humber’s reputation for quality continued into the early 20th century, with significant expansions and introductions of new models. However, the company faced financial struggles that led to a merger with Hillman in 1929, under the auspices of the Rootes Group. This move was strategic, aiming to stabilize Humber through a broader portfolio and stronger market presence.

Despite a strong start, Humber’s story in the latter half of the 20th century was marked by challenges. After being acquired by Chrysler in 1967, the brand struggled to maintain its distinct identity. The final Humber-branded model was the Sceptre, which was eventually discontinued in 1976. Today, Humber’s legacy lives on through the surviving vehicles and a rich history that enthusiasts continue to celebrate.

My Dream Supercars collection

By Marcus Newark

0 items

Similar

No results available

Reset

Pages related to Humber

My Dream Supercars collection

By Marcus Newark

0 items

Similar

No results available

Reset

Related pages