1909 - 1925

Mercer

Information about Mercer

Mercer, an emblematic car brand, was born in 1909 under the creative auspices of individuals like A.R. Kingston, E.T. George, and C.G. Roebling. This pioneering trio propelled the Mercer Automobile Company to fame from its base in Trenton, New Jersey. Mercer swiftly made a mark with its 1910 debut of the Type-35 Raceabout, a model celebrated for its formidable performance in the nascent motorsport scene. The Raceabout, which could reach over 90 mph, was a testament to Mercer’s engineering prowess, winning five out of six races in 1911.

However, the brand’s fortunes waned following the tragic demise of key figure Washington A. Roebling II in the Titanic disaster in 1912 and subsequent managerial shake-ups. Despite a brief revival in the 1920s with new models and innovations like the addition of front brakes in 1924, Mercer struggled to regain its early 20th-century vigor. The company ceased production permanently in 1925 after a turbulent couple of decades marked by financial instability and changing ownership.

In a nostalgic homage to its storied past, the Mercer name was resurrected in the 1960s through a collaboration involving famed designer Virgil Exner, who conceptualized a modern Mercer-Cobra Roadster. This concept car, featuring elements like copper and brass detailing, was a tribute to the original Mercer Raceabout’s spirit, melding historical legacy with contemporary design. Although this project garnered attention, it represented a fleeting echo of the brand’s former glory rather than a full-fledged comeback.

The story of Mercer is one of brilliant beginnings and untimely endings, capturing a significant chapter in automotive history where innovation met the inexorable forces of change.

My Dream Supercars collection

By Marcus Newark

0 items

Similar

No results available

Reset

Pages related to Mercer

My Dream Supercars collection

By Marcus Newark

0 items

Similar

No results available

Reset

Related pages